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"I may not know how to fly but I know how to read and that's almost the same thing."-- Gregory Maguire, Out of Oz

"...while finding true love was one of the most splendid things that could happen to you in life, finding a friend was equally splendid." -- Felix J Palma, The Map of the Sky

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Tuesday, February 11, 2014

Top Ten Books That Will Make You Swoon

My picks for the Tuesday Top Ten, as invented by The Broke and Bookish. Today's theme is: Books That Will Make You Swoon...And I admit I hesitated with this list, because I hear the word "swoon" and I know it is something often related to romance... And I don't read a lot of romance. I briefly considered not doing TTT today or just a partial list, but then I looked up the definition of "swoon" for inspiration and courage.
Swoon
1.
to faint from extreme emotion.
2. to be overwhelmed by ecstatic joy.
 By those definitions this list opened up a bit, didn't it? Some of my favorite books are favorites because of the emotions they evoked.

1. Dracula by Bram Stoker. This book inspired so many spin-offs: movies, plays, shows, and books. And for those more familiar with the "romantic" versions: The original was never really a romance novel. I swooned with fear from the intense atmosphere, the fate of the Demeter, and the cold obsessive rage of the monster.

2. Good Omens by Terry Pratchett & Neil Gaiman. I nearly died of laughter! Ironic because you'd think the Apocalypse would be no laughing matter. When I read it, people looked at me strangely, because I'd just burst out and couldn't stop.

3. Neverwhere by Neil Gaiman. I swooned with desire. This book made me want to slip through the cracks and find a new world beneath my feet. It's a rare author that can make me jealous of a fictional character.

4. The Sight by David Clement-Davies. I read this as a kid and years later I still come back to it. There's something magical about wolves; we love to fear them, we love to love them. This story took iconic sights a white wolf, a black wolf, a pack...and turned these things into a tale of good vs evil, nurture vs nature, man vs wild, and power vs intention. Euphoria and sadness.

5. The Broken Kingdoms by NK Jemisin. Oree a blind artist, gives a man suffering from a strange curse, shelter. This is a story of vengeful Gods, convoluted politics, and love. I was awed by the power in this work Jemisin created, and the sacrifice "Shiny" is forced to make.

6. The Book of Lost Things by John Connolly. And we're back to fear, lol. Ever wonder what would happen if the bad thoughts you dared to think were ever given a life of their own? David is a sad, angry little boy who is caught between dark, petty desires, and the right thing; he'll be forced to confront both when he climbs through a hole in the wall. Nothing terrifies and enlightens, like a fairy-tale turned sour.

7. Twilight by Stephanie Meyer. I swear to God, I did not want to love this book as much as I did. It's cheesy, the writing wasn't as strong as it could be, Bella wasn't strong as she could be, Edward wasn't as nice as he could be... But I loved it. When he jumped in front of the car for her, when she followed him to the meadow... Maybe the writing could have been better, but the story was there. And maybe my ideal boyfriend wouldn't be a control-freak, but I wouldn't say no to half that devotion and trust.

8. The Host by Stephanie Meyer. Once she hooked me with Twilight, I wanted to see what else she'd do. Twi-hards didn't like it as much as Twilight---> I thought it was way better. The writing improved, the characters had to go through a fair amount of chaos and pain before the could consider settling down. And I admit, I always wanted to see an alien story where the aliens aren't so easily defeated.

9. Feed by Mira Grant. Okay, so this book makes it onto just about every list I do... Even with that in mind... Georgia Mason's last scene in this book left me stunned, speechless, and tear-stained. Never had I seen an author do something like that with such emotion and such brutality.

10.  Let the Right One In by John Ajvide Lindqvist. I started this list with a vampire novel and I'll end it with one. What I love about Mr. Lindqvist's work? He depicts protagonists who are as unnerving as the monsters. By the time you know who the "bad-guy" is you're a little slower to point finger. I'd compare this guy to Bram Stoker before I compared him to Stephen King... He made me love a villain.

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